recruiting

What’s the best advice you ever got?

We get advice all the time. From people that we know, we respect and those we don’t know and we don’t necessarily respect….but we learn from regardless. Here is a collection of advice from a group of people from all walks of life…. May something resonate with you!

1. Don’t lose sight.

“‘People who used to run car companies were really into cars. People who ran hotel chains loved hospitality. Now, everything is run by accountants, and you feel it as a consumer.‘ This slightly grumpy rant from one of my mentors, the famed mad man Martin Puris, inspires me to stay focused on the purity and passion of a business pursuit.”  –Andrew Deitchman, co-founder of The New Stand

2. You get only what you settle for.

“The best business advice I ever got came from my dear old Dad. It’s quite simple and immeasurably powerful. It goes like this: ‘You, and only you, should set the value of your talents, ideas, services, and/or product. Don’t ever expect anyone to pay or give you more than they have to.’ As an entrepreneur, you have to get used to the fact that, quite often, you’ll be faced with an offer that seems less than the value of your talent, ideas, services, or product. That’s business. You are the sole arbiter of what you, your ideas, services, or product is worth. Therefore, what you get is what you are willing to settle for. You have to fight for what you feel you’re worth. Not that settling is necessarily a bad thing, but where you end up is what you settle for. Sage advice.” –Neil Powell, fine artist and co-founder of Mugnacious

3. Be clear and transparent.

“I learned many things while working for Steve Jobs in the ’90s, including what not to do. While Steve was arguably the greatest marketer of our generation and gave some of the most inspirational speeches of our time, he wasn’t the best communicator when it came to individuals. Steve didn’t set defined expectations for me or other employees: he simply knew it when he saw it. Watching him operate made me recognize the importance of clarity and transparency with my team, and how imperative it is to set expectations and effectively communicate with them. The more transparent I am about where I want to take the company, the clearer my team is about how to get there. Making sure everyone is on board before you make business decisions will help ensure you won’t alienate people (sometimes your best ones) in the process.” –James Green, serial entrepreneur and CEO of technology company Magnetic

4. Forget “having it all.”

“These days, there’s an ongoing debate about whether women can ‘have it all,’ and I’ve often been asked that question. I’m a person who likes to give 100 percent to everything I do. I want to be the best at my job and as a mother. But I realize I can only give 100 percent in the moment. If I’m at work, am I giving 100 percent to my kids? No. If I’m at home, am I giving 100 percent to my work? No. It’s a balancing act, but worthwhile as long as we don’t kid ourselves that we’re superwomen.”  –from the book Getting Real by Gretchen Carlson, host of The Real Story with Gretchen Carlson on Fox News, used by permission

5. Don’t get caught in analysis paralysis.

“Work is never going to be as slow as it is today. The pace of business in general — and start-ups specifically — will only quicken in 2016. So, we have to make a lot of important decisions quickly. I got some great advice early in life, which was: ‘Sometimes you won’t know the right decision, so you have to make the decision right.’ In other words, when you lack perfect information and time, you have to be thoughtful about your process, be diligent in your analysis, then make the decision quickly. After that, it’s all about execution and putting all your energy into making it work.” –Don Smithmier, founder and CEO of The Big Know

6. Listening is very different from hearing.

“The best piece of advice ever imparted to me comes from my mom, who is fond of saying ‘What you say matters less than what people hear and understand.’  As a teacher, she was a brilliant listener, and she used what she heard to build a bridge between what she needed to teach and how the student needed to learn. From that, she taught me to focus my efforts on helping people understand rather than on what I wanted to tell them. She taught me how to hear, and it is the single most important skill in my professional success.” –Courtney Buechert, founder and CEO of creative marketing agency Eleven, Inc.

7. Put your weirdness into your work.

“These words were spoken to me by famed voice-over and recording artist Ken Nordine. This was many years ago, and I’ve carried these words with me ever since. He recognized that we all get a little weird from time to time, but it’s how we choose to channel our weirdness that’s key. To offset my very ordinary life, I infuse every project I touch with experimental and fluid creations. It’s what’s led to my best work and most successful endeavors. With weirdness and imaginative thinking embedded in all facets of your work, you are free to spend the rest of your time enjoying the little things in life, a balance that is delicate yet so profound.” –David Slayden, founder and executive director of designer-founder accelerator BDW

8. Action creates opportunity.

“There’s a variety of advice that has had lasting impact, but this is the one that I continue to return to on a weekly basis. It’s a quote from my former CEO. This phrase remains valuable in the big and small, in the tactical and the strategic. We are in an industry that requires the creation and fostering of constant change. We have to invent new ideas, create new services and capabilities, all while increasing the quality of our craft. So while we can all spend an endless amount of time contemplating and planning, there is one force that cannot be denied. Take action, as it will surely create and open up new opportunities.” –Ed Brojerdi, CEO of  KBS New York and co-founder of Spies & Assassins

9. No cohesion, no team.

“In creative industries especially, teams are central to the work. They are integral to collaborative cultures and, far more often than not, essential to innovation. What too many people fail to recognize, however, is that two or more people working together doesn’t automatically constitute a ‘team.’ These people may be partners and co-workers, but that’s not enough to effect the magic that genuine teamwork can produce. When I was running the brand-strategy practice for consultancy FutureBrand, we assembled teams to take on each assignment and were careful to include a diversity of skills and backgrounds in each. I couldn’t help but notice, though, that certain teams were far more effective than others. In a management meeting, we discussed the issue and then we each went off to gather more data. When we reconvened, the lesson became clear: No cohesion, no team. It turned out that the highest performing teams simply liked each other more. They would break for dinners. Go bowling. Share their weekend plans and recaps. They genuinely cared about one another. And that led to a level of performance that far outstripped anything that less cohesive teams could hope to achieve. I keep that lesson in mind, not just when I’m putting teams together but also when I’m hiring. However brilliant or accomplished a prospect is, I don’t want to hire that person if he or she can’t play well with others. I look for the right mix of skills and mindset, of course, but beyond that I want to know that the person will be worthy of colleagues’ trust and a positive presence within the company. If not, I’d prefer that person play on someone else’s team.” –Andrew Benett, Global CEO of Havas Worldwide and Havas Creative Group

10. See the spaces, not the trees.

“This is a snowboarding reference. It can be daunting, standing at the top of the mountain readying yourself for the trip down, and seeing all the trees in your path. But the key is to see the space between the trees. This sort of mindset, seeing the opportunity and not the obstacles, is important as you start out on your next life chapter, both personally and professionally. When you’re deep into your work or facing a personal challenge, it’s easier to see the barriers, but don’t let them stop you from pursuing the opportunity that exists around them. Remember the business of your business. Many companies get caught up in the service they provide versus what actually drives their business. For example, Twitter is a micro-blogging service. But at the end of the day, what pays the bills is selling ads and sponsored tweets on the platform. Don’t lose sight of the actual economics of your business; it’s what keeps the lights on

6 Traits- What To Hire For:

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Celebrating 21 years in the Wine Industry

 

There’s two things you need to know, right off the bat, about these hiring criteria.

First and most obviously, the six criteria on Danny’s list are psychological traits, not technical skills.  Even though it is generally easier to hire for technical skills, whether they are knife skills in the kitchen, great customer-centric leaders like Meyer feel confident that they can teach technical know-how to almost any newly-hired employee, but on the other hand find the idea of teaching empathy, teaching work ethic and so forth to be essentially a fool’s errand, much better addressed in the selection process than in post-employment training and discipline.

The second point is this: Even though you’ll be hiring for personality traits rather than technical skills, you still need to develop highly-skilled employees before they even face the first customer. Otherwise, you’re doing your customers (and your company) a huge disservice.

 

Meyer: “I used to think that you could just hire people for their emotional skills and if they had the six essential emotional skills, that’s all it took. I learned the hard way that you can’t unleash somebody’s hospitality unless you have first completely drilled all the systems, the technical skills and know-how that are needed, to a point of excellence.”

In other words:  These wonderful, warm personality traits that you have hired your new employees for aren’t going to manifest themselves in ways that are useful to your customers until the training for skills is complete and has become second nature.

Meyer compares this to learning to drive a stick shift.

I remember when I first learned to drive a stick shift [as a teenager back in St. Louis], I had absolutely no idea what I was doing. And until I had learned to be proficient at doing that, I wasn’t having any fun while I was driving. I wasn’t switching the stations on the radio dial. I wasn’t telling jokes to my friends. I wasn’t pointing out the beautiful trees on the side of the road.

At that beginner’s stage, I was “all systems all the time.” But once I learned those systems, how to shift gears, find a sticking point when I was on a hill, all those kinds to things that are really taught. Once I cleared all that out, that’s when I could get back to being myself and pick the best music for whoever was in the car, tell jokes with people, you know, enjoy the scenery.

So even though the emotional skills that lead to hospitality are not really teachable, but they are also not revealable until first you’ve learned the systems, the technical side of getting the job done.”

Meyer and his Union Square Hospitality Group restaurants hire for what Meyer calls an employee’s “hospitality quotient.”  These are the six traits he feels are required for an employee to have the potential to provide true hospitality to the guests of his restaurants.

Here’s his list of six traits to hire for, which I’m using here with his permission and hope you find useful.

1. Optimistic warmth (genuine kindness, thoughtfulness, and a sense that the glass is always at least half full);

2. Intelligence (not just “smarts” but rather an insatiable curiosity to learn for the sake of learning);

3. Work ethic (a natural tendency to do something as well as it can possibly be done);

4. Empathy (an awareness of, care for, and connection to how others feel and how your actions make others feel)

5. Self-awareness (an understanding of what makes you tick;

6.  Integrity (a natural inclination to be accountable for doing the right thing with honesty and superb judgment).

Micah Solomon is a customer service consultant, customer experience speaker and bestselling business author, most recently of High-Tech, High-Touch Customer Service

 




Hiring Process: Not About Who, but About Why?

Although the Selection and Hiring Process may seem time and step-intensive, hiring the right person for the right job is one of the most important responsibilities a company has – one that has far reaching and long lasting effects.  Investing the time at the front-end of the process by selecting the right recruiting firm and carefully and thoughtfully deciding with them what functions the person must perform and the skills necessary to successfully perform those functions, will help you attract, hire and retain your human capital.

A small to mid-size business invests 30%of budget dollars in humans – that is why recruiting and retention matter.  When we think of our people as an investment, it begs the question, what are your expectations for the dollars spent? What do you want to see as a return on that investment?  Before making that next investment, take a moment to determine what you truly need and then make your plan.  Take a sufficient amount of time to outline each step by beginning with a solid recruiting and hiring process.It is important to develop a recruiting process that suits the needs of your company, one in which you are comfortable enough to use routinely.
Often, when an employee leaves, it feels natural to want to replace the person and hire for the same role when, in fact, the situation presents a great opportunity for you to assess your current staff.   What are your teams strengths and skills?  Where are the gaps?
Perhaps the position previously held was sufficient at the time, however now we have a chance to add skills that are more in-line with the company’s needs and vision.
Once you have identified the skills present, you can now define the essential skills and functions needed to fill the opening.  This brings us to the next step, defining the position.
 Capturing the essential functions, experience, knowledge, skills and abilities in a job description will provide a guide for us as we begin the quest toward filling the position.  Job descriptions play a key role to not only define the position initially, it is used to craft job advertisements, to set expectations both during the interview and post-hire, support for daily coaching and, if necessary, as a document for disciplinary actions.In addition, the job description is a terrific place to begin when crafting your interview questions.  Begin with the essential functions.  Take each function and create behavior-based questions designed to get the candidate to describe how/when he/she performed such a function, what tasks were involved, what actions were taken and what were the overall results. Using a standard list of skill-based and behavior-based questions provides an equal assessment field for which you can evaluate candidates.Additional tools are available to assist with the decision-making piece of the equation.  Consider, for a nominal amount of time and money you can incorporate reference checks, assessments and telephone screenings.  These tools, although helpful, do not provide the answer; these tools provide insights and additional information for consideration along with the other critical pieces.

Recruiting best practices includes taking a holistic look at all information available to make the best selection for your company’s needs.

Change in our Midst

We are seeing enormous change in the wine business. One can continue to expect significant changes in the way wine is marketed and sold, with increased global competition.

In any economic climate, you must be able to find the right people for key positions. Motivated, successful people do not read the want ads, nor do they respond to haphazard telephone sales efforts to recruit them. However, talented and qualified candidates do respond to reasoned approaches from people and organizations that they trust.

For twenty years, Benchmark Consulting has conducted retained search exclusively for the wine community. We have provided the widest possible universe of qualified, motivated candidates in the sales, marketing, general management, financial and technical/production functional areas for our clients.
Our success has been based on simple beliefs and hard work.

Flat Fee Recruiting is based on that belief. With this latest facet we still bring you the Benchmark recruitment process without the hidden fees you often find with typical retained search organizations. One fee..not a percentage. Quality process, qualtiy candidates…cost savings to you. Contact us today before this offer ends at the end of September.

High End Wine Sales Fueling Napa Deals

SAN FRANCISCO – A new era for California’s priciest wine regions began Feb. 1, when PlumpJack Winery partners bought 50 acres in Napa Valley’s Stags Leap district, home to heralded vintners Shafer Vineyards, Clos du Val and Cliff Lede Vineyards.

The purchase kicked off a sales spree for premium properties across the state that’s poised to climb to $800 million by year’s end, the most since the 2007 market peak, according to Demeter Group, a San Francisco-based consumer investment bank and advisory firm.

“It’s been a complete turnaround,” said Stephen Rannekleiv, lead U.S. wine analyst in New York for Rabobank Nederland, the Utrecht, Netherlands-based bank that finances agriculture businesses. “There’s lots of interest in good California properties right now. If you’ve got vineyard acreage, it’s a hot commodity.”

Renewed dealmaking follows three years of plunging demand for high-end California wine, which accounts for more than two-thirds of U.S. bottle sales above $20, according to data compiled by Nielsen Holdings. The recession that started in December 2007 turned luxury consumers into bargain hunters “dancing on the graves of bloated wine inventories,” Rob McMillan, wine division founder at SVB Financial Group’s Silicon Valley Bank, wrote in an April 17 industry report.

Purchases of California premium wine totaled $410 million in the 12 months through July 21, up 14 percent year-over-year and better than the 11 percent gain for all U.S. luxury producers in the period, store-scan data from New York-based Nielsen show. High-end wine sales are advancing at more than double the rate of overall wine sales, with north coast warehouse shipments up 12 percent in the first half of 2012 from a year earlier, said industry consultant John Gomberg, based in Woodside, Calif.

Credit availability is unlocking sales, as mortgage distress abates and wineries streamline operations, said Jeff Menashe, Demeter Group’s chief executive officer. Vineyard defaults plunged last year by 61 percent in Napa and 44 percent in Sonoma from the 2009 peak, when 18 properties in each county entered the first stage of foreclosure, according to DataQuick. For the first seven months of 2012, only four vineyards in Napa, 50 miles north of San Francisco, and eight in Sonoma were in default, the research firm said.

“Luxury wine has gone from having significant headwinds to meaningful tailwinds,” Menashe said. “The industry is growing at the ultra-premium end. Everyone is trying to push up.”

Distressed sales in 2011 were limited to “fringe” properties outside prime growing districts, according to a year-end summary by the California chapter of the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers.

“It’s a fairly healthy situation, with access to credit again and strategic buyers looking for really good property,” said Bill Stevens, Silicon Valley Bank’s wine division manager in St. Helena, Calif. “Wine producers got right-sized.”

The lender’s wine unit had $374 million in mortgages secured by real estate as of June 30, an 8.1 percent increase from the end of 2011, according to an Aug. 8 regulatory filing from the Santa Clara, Calif.-based company. About $500 million in vineyard and winery deals in the north and central coast regions of California were completed this year through Aug. 13, Demeter Group data show.